WEEK 58


Here's a short synopsis on Shakespeare (Wikipedia style) to be followed by 16 of his more famous quotations.

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[nb 1] was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[1] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[2][nb 2] His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays,[nb 3] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[3]Shakespeare was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613 at age 49, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.[4] Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.[5][nb 4] His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the 16th century. He then wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608, including Hamlet, King Lear, Othello, and Macbeth, considered some of the finest works in the English language. In his last phase, he wrote tragicomedies, also known as romances, and collaborated with other playwrights.  Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. In 1623, John Heminges and Henry Condell, two friends and fellow actors of Shakespeare, published the First Folio, a collected edition of his dramatic works that included all but two of the plays now recognised as Shakespeare's. It was prefaced with a poem by Ben Jonson, in which Shakespeare is hailed, presciently, as "not of an age, but for all time."[6]

Shakespeare was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the 19th century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians worshipped Shakespeare with a reverence that George Bernard Shaw called "bardolatry".[7] In the 20th century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are constantly studied, performed, and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the worlgreat, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them.

Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness upon them.
— William Shakespeare
A fool thinks himself to be wise, but a wise man knows himself to be a fool.
— William Shakespeare
The course of true love never did run smooth.
— William Shakespeare
Listen to many, speak to a few.
— William Shakespeare
There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so.
— William Shakespeare
This above all; to thine own self be true.
— William Shakespeare
The empty vessel makes the loudest sound.
— William Shakespeare
What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.
— William Shakespeare
Life is as tedious as twice told tale, vexing the dull ear of a drowsy man.
— William Shakespeare
No legacy is so rich as honesty.
— William Shakespeare
Who could refrain that had a heart to love and in that heart courage to make love known?
— William Shakespeare
How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world.
— William Shakespeare
Love all, trust a few, do wrong to none.
— William Shakespeare
We know what we are, but know not what we may be.
— William Shakespeare
Our doubts are traitors and make us lose the good we often might win by fearing to attempt.
— William Shakespeare
A coward dies a thousand times before his death, but the valiant taste of death but once. It seems to me most strange that men should fear, seeing that death, a necessary end, will come when it will come.
— William Shakespeare