WEEK 63


Einstein stated that intelligence is finite. Einstein never met Maya Angelou. For those of you that are unfamiliar with her (I was six months ago), I give you Wikipedia's summary of Angelou. This is to be followed by pure unadulterated Maya.
 

Maya Angelou (/ˈm.ə ˈænəl/;[1][2] born Marguerite Ann Johnson; April 4, 1928) is an American author and poet. She has published seven autobiographies, five books of essays, and several books of poetry, and is credited with a list of plays, movies, and television shows spanning more than fifty years. She has received dozens of awards and over thirty honorary doctoral degrees. Angelou is best known for her series of autobiographies, which focus on her childhood and early adult experiences. The first, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (1969), tells of her life up to the age of seventeen, and brought her international recognition and acclaim.

Angelou's list of occupations includes pimp, prostitute, night-club dancer and performer, castmember of the opera Porgy and Bess, coordinator for Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Southern Christian Leadership Conference, author, journalist in Egypt and Ghana during the days of decolonization, and actor, writer, director, and producer of plays, movies, and public television programs. Since 1982, she has taught at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where she holds the first lifetime Reynolds Professorship of American Studies. She was active in the Civil Rights movement, and worked with both Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. Since the 1990s she has made around eighty appearances a year on the lecture circuit, something she continued into her eighties. In 1993, Angelou recited her poem "On the Pulse of Morning" at President Bill Clinton's inauguration, the first poet to make an inaugural recitation since Robert Frost at John F. Kennedy's inauguration in 1961.

With the publication of I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Angelou was one of the first African American women who was able to publicly discuss her personal life. She is respected as a spokesperson of Black people and women, and her works have been considered a defense of Black culture. Although attempts have been made to ban her books from some US libraries, her works are widely used in schools and universities worldwide. Angelou's major works have been labeled as autobiographical fiction, but many critics have characterized them as autobiographies. She has made a deliberate attempt to challenge the common structure of the autobiography by critiquing, changing, and expanding the genre. Her books center on themes such as racism, identity, family, and travel. Angelou is best known for her autobiographies, but she is also an established poet, although her poems have received mixed reviews.

Let me add the obvious-- philosopher/thinker extraordinaire!!!!

May I suggest reading the entirety(unabridged version) of Wikipedia's summation of her life. The assessment "unbelievably interesting" does not come close to accurately encapsulating her brilliance (nor does it justice).

If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change your attitude.
— Maya Angelou
Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope.
— Maya Angelou
There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.
— Maya Angelou
I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.
— Maya Angelou
Music was my refuge. I could crawl into the space between the notes and curl my back to loneliness.
— Maya Angelou
I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.
— Maya Angelou
Words mean more than what is set down on paper. It takes the human voice to infuse them with deeper meaning.
— Maya Angelou
If we lose love and self respect for each other, this is how we finally die.
— Maya Angelou
My life has been one great big joke, a dance that’s walked, a song that’s spoke. I laugh so hard I almost choke when I think about myself.
— Maya Angelou
Children’s talent to endure stems from their ignorance of alternatives.
— Maya Angelou
We may encounter many defeats but we must not be defeated.
— Maya Angelou
My great hope is to laugh as much as I cry; to get my work done and try to love somebody and have the courage to accept the love in return.
— Maya Angelou
History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.
— Maya Angelou
The ache for home lives in all of us, the safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.
— Maya Angelou
One isn’t necessarily born with courage, but one is born with potential. Without courage, we cannot practice any other virtue with consistency. We can’t be kind, true, merciful, generous, or honest.
— Maya Angelou