WEEK 90


For years I have pontificated on the deficiencies of our educational system- or perhaps its limitations. I have even tried to persuade a number of young adults to avoid higher institutions indicating to them that it may be unlikely that they will ever be able to cost justify it. For an individual who has had twenty- one years of formal schooling in addition to a three year residency in internal medicine, it is so very clear that schooling, by itself, is far from sufficient in becoming an "educated man." In this sense "schooling" is like "money"-- it's not very important unless you don't have it.

I feel that there are many, many thinkers/philosophers who are both much smarter than me, more mentally developed and have put tremendously more effort into this subject than I. And yet, I do think that I would like to list some semi-random thoughts for you (in bullet fashion) which you might find to be relatively enlightening. Hell, as they say, even a stopped clock is correct twice a day.

 

* The educational arena has been commandeered by a group of so-called educators who have, to a degree, poisoned the

educational environment. Instead of fostering/developing children from within they have focused on indoctrinating from outside.

* This indoctrination occurs for many reasons. Some of them being done consciously, semi-consciously and subconsciously.

* The educators have clearly placed their own psychological needs ahead of their student's development.

*In short this is what I have concluded (simplifying it) about our schooling-

1) The biggest myth about schooling is that "Schooling is sufficient." I would assert to you that it is:

a) Usually helpful but woefully insufficient.

b) Erroneously seduces people into thinking that should they put the time and effort into passing college that that degree certifies that they are good thinkers, problem solvers and are clearly an "educated man." Of course this goes doubly so should they have obtained a masters or graduate degree.

c) Focuses the majority of its energies on the lesser areas of importance while it almost completely avoids essentials- problem solving, the emotional and social realm-- including conflict resolution--(absolutely minimizing psychology)

d) Puts much more emphasis on memorization and regurgitation as opposed to development of thought through Socratic method. Each generation, in surgical fashion, lobotomizes/neuters the following generation. By doing so the elder generation feels psychologically more serene-- they feel less threatened by or jealous of their students that may have a superior intellect than themselves or their own children.

e)Our educators have a political agenda fraught with socialist ideas. They favor the many over the one. They believe that the tyranny of having one's life controlled pales in comparison to the NEEDS(i.e. food/shelter-- not freedom of thought/behavior). They see this individual's  loss as a casualty of war- they don't believe that if one loses we all lose. Communism's credo is-- From each according to their ability to each according to their needs. Capitalism's credo is-- From each according to their ability to each according to their ability.

f)Our educators talk of promoting diversity in our higher institutions. Unfortunately they are talking much more about diversity of ethnicity, not diversity of thought. They are far too comfortable with having 75+% of educators having a "progressive" political affiliation. Many, many universities actively try to squelch intellectual discussion. I have found the progressives to be the least tolerant. They tend to viciously demean those that they deem intolerant. I am open to the possibility that they are not really worse than the general public
but their hypocrisy just makes it seem that they are the least tolerant.

 

Sorry for the rant. Apparently, I have not held my cards close enough to my vest and have tried to indoctrinate you in similar fashion to how our educators inflict their educational culture/agenda on the 12 year olds of our nation.

Far from being a comprehensive treatise on our nation's schooling, I tried to skim the surface on a wide variety of interesting conundrums in 500 words or less.

Hope you got a tidbit from this and hopefully you'll find the quotes and differences between schooling and education to be intriguing.
I suspect that less than 50% of those who I sent this email to even open it and I also believe that only 50% of those who started to read it
were able to make it through. For those who made it, I will attempt to reward you for your discipline. Below are some quotes on schooling that
you may enjoy:

 

Don’t let schooling interfere with your education.
— Mark Twain
A human life is a schooling for eternity.
— Gottfried Keller
While formal schooling is an important advantage, it is not a guarantee of success nor is its absence a fatal handicap.
— Ray Kroc
All that schooling never prepares you for the reality of life.
— Juliette Lewis
School reform is not enough. The notion of schooling itself must be challenged.
— John Taylor Gatto
I’ve been making a list of the things they don’t teach you at school. They don’t teach you how to love somebody. They don’t teach you how to be famous. They don’t teach you how to be rich or how to be poor. They don’t teach you how to walk away from someone you don’t love any longer. They don’t teach you how to know what’s going on in someone else’s mind. They don’t teach you what to say to someone who’s dying. They don’t teach you anything worth knowing.
— Neil Gaiman, The Sandman, Vol. 9: The Kindly Ones
Ideally, what should be said to every child, repeatedly, throughout his or her school life is something like this: You are in the process of being indoctrinated. We have not yet evolved a system of education that is not a system of indoctrination. We are sorry, but it is the best we can do. What you are being taught here is an amalgam of current prejudice and the choices of this particular culture. The slightest look at history will show how impermanent these must be. You are being taught by people who have been able to accommodate themselves to a regime of thought laid down by their predecessors. It is a self-perpetuating system. Those of you who are more robust and individual than others will be encouraged to leave and find ways of educating yourself — educating your own judgements. Those that stay must remember, always, and all the time, that they are being moulded and patterned to fit into the narrow and particular needs of this particular society.
— Doris Lessing, The Golden Notebook
I’ve been making a list of the things they don’t teach you at school. They don’t teach you how to love somebody. They don’t teach you how to be famous. They don’t teach you how to be rich or how to be poor. They don’t teach you how to walk away from someone you don’t love any longer. They don’t teach you how to know what’s going on in someone else’s mind. They don’t teach you what to say to someone who’s dying. They don’t teach you anything worth knowing.
— Neil Gaiman, The Sandman, Vol. 9: The Kindly Ones

Once you leave out all the bullshit they teach you in school, life gets really simple.
— George Carlin, Brain Droppings
Wisdom is not a product of schooling but of the lifelong attempt to acquire it.
— Albert Einstein
“What a school thinks about its library is a measure of what it feels about education.”
— Harold Howe